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2006 MEDIA NEWS

NEWS, FRIENDS, MUSIC, VIDEO ENGULF MEDIA-ENGROSSED MASSES
December 26, 2006 (NashuaTelegraph) Cell phones are becoming a common accessory in the average person’s pocket. But to many teens, phones and all kinds of electronics – are, in terms of necessity, right up there with air. It’s no surprise that many of today’s teens are hooked up, plugged in and online. New information released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau’s Statistical Abstract of the United States says adults and teens will spend nearly half of 2007 reading newspapers, watching TV, listening to music on personal devices and surfing the Internet. That shakes out to about five months – 3,518 hours – Americans will be engaged in one or more forms of media. Read Story

BEST AND WORST ADS OF '06
December 22, 2006 (Wall Street Journal) People may remember 2006 as the year of anti-advertising, when marketers and their ad agencies went to great lengths to make sure their ads didn't look like typical Madison Avenue handiwork. Read Story

A TV SHOWS CONTENT CALLS THE COMMERCIAL PLAYS
December 21, 2006 (New York Times) Sports commentators will not be the only ones remarking on Sunday’s National Football League games. Animated raccoons will also give instant feedback in advertisements for Wendy’s International that will be shown at the start of commercial breaks. If the score is 0-0, an ad might start with a Wendy’s raccoon standing in front of an overturned trash can, saying, “I may be nocturnal, but this game is putting me to sleep.” “This is where the future’s going,” said Chris Boothe, president of Starcom USA, a media-buying agency that is part of the Publicis Groupe. “We think that everything’s going toward more customization. It’s making sure that the message to the consumer is happening at exactly the time it is relevant.” Read Story

INTERNET, TV: THE LINES BLUR
December 20, 2006 (Star Tribune) Is TV moving onto the Internet or is the Internet moving onto TV? As the lines between the two blur, it's getting harder to tell. Online TV program offerings, from those found on network sites to video giant YouTube Inc. to smaller startups, are eliminating the traditional barrier between TV's small screen and the computer's. But putting TV shows on the Internet is only one part of the equation -- the easier part. Getting shows downloaded or streamed over the Internet to play on living-room sets has been more difficult. Read Story

TUTORED BY BARBIE AND BRATZ, GIRLS GROW UP FAST
December 17, 2006 (Knox National News) Lydia Yaffe of San Francisco has two girls, ages 5 and 8. She doesn't quite remember when her older daughter first asked for a Bratz doll, but she estimates it was when she was 5. Currently, she says they have a "minimum" of 12 Barbies and eight Bratz each. "Can I say this? With the sluttier Bratz," she said, noting that her parents' generation probably thought the same of her Barbie dolls. "The way I look at it, it's Barbie evolving into the new millennium."
Read Story

ADVERTISERS TRY NEW WAYS TO GET IN YOUR HEAD
December 16, 2006 (ABC News) f you're like most Americans, by the time you get to work in the morning, marketers have tried to sell you something more than 200 times. Ads are now in places they've never been before — from subway turnstiles to the floors of parking garages, and from bathroom stalls to video games. But advertising experts say the more conventional ad barrage isn't capturing consumers' attention. Read Story

TIMES SQUARE ADS SPREAD VIA TOURISTS CAMERAS
December 11, 2006 (NY Times) Advertisers have long been drawn to Times Square as a valuable place to reach consumers, paying hundreds of thousands of dollars for space on billboards and blazing video screens. ut recently they have discovered that down on the ground, new technology has given low cost, face-to-face marketing campaigns something of a cutting edge as consumers spread their messages on the Internet. Take the recent display of public toilets set up by Charmin bathroom tissue: Used by thousands in Times Square and viewed by 7,400 Web users on one site alone. Read Story

AS WEB VIDEOS BECOME LONGER LENGTH, CONCERN RISES OVER TELEVISION'S IMPACT
December 8, 2006 (BusinessWeek) Though TV executives don't have to sweat the Internet immediately, they have cause for concern on the horizon. Over the next couple of years, users are bound to demand longer Internet video as impediments to watching high-quality content online disappear, say industry players. That's going to create more competition for television networks as Internet users have to choose between watching a half-hour network show on air, watching a half-hour independently produced Internet show, or watching on-demand TV shows. Read Story

VIEWERS CONTINUE TO BE INTRIGUED BY USER-GENERATED CONTENT AND COMMERCIALS
December 7, 2006 (NY Times) The promotional contest, a Madison Avenue mainstay, is being freshened for a new generation through an increasingly popular marketing tactic known as user-generated content. Advertisers like Chipotle, Converse, General Motors and MasterCard have been gaining attention by inviting consumers to use the new video technologies to create commercials. For instance, more than 1,000 entries have been submitted to the Frito-Lay division of PepsiCo in a “Crash the Super Bowl” contest to create a commercial for Doritos snack chips. The winning spot is scheduled to appear during Super Bowl XLI on Feb. 4. Read Story

PEDIATRICIANS BLAST INAPPROPRIATE ADVERTISING
December 3, 2006 (Houston Chronicle) Inappropriate advertising contributes to many kids' ills, from obesity to anorexia, to drinking booze and having sex too soon, and Congress should crack down on it, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. The influential doctors' group issued a new policy statement in response to what it calls a rising tide of advertising aimed at children. The policy appears in December's Pediatrics, scheduled for release Monday. Read Story

VERIZON MAKES MOBILE PACT WITH YOUTUBE
November 28, 2006 (Washington Post) In the biggest such deal yet, Verizon Wireless customers who subscribe to its V Cast video and music service will be able to use their mobile phones to tap videos from YouTube. The exclusive deal, whose terms were not disclosed, is likely to spur rival carriers to seek similar arrangements with YouTube or other video sites. Read Story

PULITZER PRIZE ALLOWS USE OF MORE ONLINE MATERIAL
November 27, 2006 (International Herald Tribune) The Pulitzer Prize Board announced that newspapers will now be allowed to submit video and interactive graphics as part of their entries for the top award in U.S. print journalism. Allowing more online material "was the next logical step," said Sig Gissler, administrator of the Pulitzers. "It emphasizes blended journalism and that's where newspapers are today." ASME: New online categories for the National Magazine Awards. Read Story

ADS IN VIDEO GAMES NEXT BIG THING
November 25, 2006 (NBC News) Critics are saying video game advertisers are targeting your kids. NBC2 Consumer Investigator Paul LaGrone found there is a new trend in the world of gaming that has many people saying kids are being exploited. Parents are not upset about video game violence. Instead, many are upset with the ‘real time advertising’ for video games their kids are seeing. The real time ads are said to be the next big thing in advertising.
Read Story

'REAL WORLD' PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO HISTORY OF REALITY TV
November 21, 2006 (LATimes) Back in the early '90s, Jonathan Murray and his partner Mary-Ellis Bunim were working with MTV on developing a scripted show for the network. It didn't take long for Murray and Bunim to realize that MTV couldn't afford to do a scripted drama, so instead they pitched them a pilot that was unscripted. It was about seven strangers of different ethnic, social and professional backgrounds who move into a New York City apartment together to find out "what happens when people stop being polite and start getting real." It was called "The Real World" and it changed television forever. Read Story

US AD CAMPAIGN IN MUSLIM WORLD GOT SHORT SHRIFT.
November 17, 2006 (Columbus Dispatch) When historians assess the Bush administration’s efforts to win friends and influence in the Islamic world, the State Department decision to woo Muslims with television ads may well become a forgotten footnote. The campaign, featuring TV spots in which Muslim-Americans talked positively of life in the United States, aired only in a few countries and lasted but a few weeks. But a new study by professors from Dallas’ Southern Methodist University and Oklahoma State University concludes that the program, officially called the Shared Values Initiative, "may have worked" and that, at the least, the ads "were capable of improving attitudes toward America" among youths abroad. Read Article

NBC, THE AGENCY?
November 17, 2006 (BusinessWeek) While NBC executives chafe at the characterization that it will demolish long-standing notions of what separates media companies from ad agencies, the idea has corporate backing. "The next natural place to use the talents of the studio is with marketers and advertisers," says George Kliavkoff, NBC Universal's chief digital officer. One big tension is that a direct relationship between networks and marketers could threaten ad agencies' middleman role. NBC's marketing efforts will primarily be "adjuncts" to existing campaigns. Read Story

FAKE NEWS: STATIONS OVERWHELMINGLY FORGET TO DISCLOSE VIDEO NEWS RELEASES
November 16, 2006 (CoaNews) The ongoing controversy over video news releases has not stopped television stations from airing the fake news segments without attribution. Over six months, the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) documented 46 stations in 22 states airing at least one VNR in their newscast. Of the 54 total VNR broadcasts described in this report, 48 provided no disclosure of the nature or source of the sponsored video. In the six other cases, disclosure was fleeting and often ambiguous. Read Story

WANT TO PLACE A PRODUCT IN A TV SHOW?
BUY AIRTIME TOO.
November 15, 2006 (AdAge) Here's a twist on the people-aren't-watching-commercials debate: More TV viewers remember product placement if it's followed by an ad. According to a "Product Placement Valuation Study" released by Nielsen Media Research today, 57% of viewers recognized a brand when viewing an integration in combination with a commercial, vs. nearly 46% of those who only watched a commercial. But that doesn't mean consumers will buy the products. Whether the brand was presented as a product placement, TV commercial or both, a little more than one-third of all viewers expressed high interest in the brands they were able to recognize. Read Story

BRAND PRODUCED SHOWS GO ON THE AIR
November 10, 2006 (NYTimes) Marketers have found a new way to try to keep viewers from tuning out: offer them TV shows, movies and online programming created by the marketers themselves, often with help from their advertising agencies. With the cost of producing original shows continuing to skyrocket, brand marketers and agencies expect that advertiser-produced shows will become an attractive, low-risk alternative to gambling on the next must-see hit. The trick for marketers is to produce good television -- not half-hour product placements. Read Story

TRENDS: THE ULTIMATE ROI: AD ICONS FOR SALE
November 10, 2006 (Adweek) YouTube rival Revver upped its challenge to the video-sharing giant's economic model, offering creators another avenue to make money off their clips: text-messaging fees. Revver and BSkyB have inked a deal for Revver's videos to populate a user-generated channel on the service, called Fame TV. Users in the United Kingdom will vote for their favorite videos via text messaging. Read Story

TRENDS: THE ULTIMATE ROI: AD ICONS FOR SALE
November 6, 2006 (Brandweek) 1.5 million easy button fans can't be wrong. The novelty items, born out of a Staples ad campaign and available at its stores for $5, have popped up on desks like mushrooms in a forest. Make that $7.5 million in revenue. Read Story

PRIME AD SPACE. IN SPACE.
November 3, 2006 (Boston Globe) In a novel bid to raise money to send a research satellite into space, a group of students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is offering companies and individuals a chance to put their advertisements into orbit around the Earth. Read Story

WHY 2 BROWSERS ARE BETTER THAN ONE
October 27, 2006 (TIME) By now you may have heard that the makers of the two leading web browsers launched their latest totally free editions, Microsoft's Internet Explorer 7 and Mozilla's Firefox 2, within a week of each other. Feature-wise, most news reports have already declared a winner: the long-awaited IE7 may be a vast improvement over its predecessors, but the new Firefox leaves it in the dust. While that's mainly true, here's what you need to know about each one, and why you should have them both on your Windows PC. (Firefox 2 is available for Mac users, although Internet Explorer is not.) Read Story

UNMASKED AS FORCE BEHIND WALMART BLOG, PR GIANT DOES DAMGE CONTROL
October 24, 2006 (New York Times) New Yorker magazine cover depicting President Bush being flooded in the Oval Office after Hurricane Katrina has been chosen by a panel of the nation’s magazine editors and designers as the best cover of the year. The illustration shows the waters rising around Mr. Bush and his top appointees as the flood from New Orleans engulfs the White House, which was criticized for failing to respond promptly and fully to the disaster. Read Story

UNMASKED AS FORCE BEHIND WALMART BLOG, PR GIANT DOES DAMGE CONTROL
October 19, 2006 (AdAge) It's ironic that Edelman Worldwide helped to write the Word of Mouth Marketing Association's code of ethics, which states: "Honesty of identity: You never obscure your identity." Richard Edelman has been apologizing a lot lately for his PR firm's blog -- written by a freelance writer -- in support of Wal-Mart. Ironic, of course, because the independent firm was publicly slapped -- and publicly apologized -- for being the force behind the Wal-Marting Across America blog that was unmasked as a fake created and paid for by Edelman. Read Story

THE GOOGLE YOUTUBE TANGO
October 17, 2006 (CoaNews) Under the radar of all but the most savvy Internet users, powerful commercial forces are rapidly creating a digital media system for the United States that threatens to undermine our ability to create a civil and just society. The takeover of YouTube by Google announced October 9 and the 2005 buyout by Rupert Murdoch of MySpace are not just about mega-deals for new media. They are the leading edge of a powerful interactive system that is being designed to serve the interests of some of the wealthiest corporations on the planet. Aware that social networking sites like MySpace and YouTube are attracting the key youth audience, and aiming to maintain their influence over future generations of consumers, marketers are aggressively seizing the initiative. Read Story

AGAINST AN IMPERIAL INTERNET
October 17, 2006 (FreePress) It was said that all roads led to Rome. However exaggerated, the image is imprinted in our imagination, reminding us of the relentless ingenuity of the ancient Romans and their will to control an empire. For centuries Roman highways linked far-flung provinces with a centralized web of power. The might of the imperial legions was for naught without the means to transport them. The flow of trade—the bloodstream of the empire’s wealth—also depended on the integrity of the roadways. And because Roman citizens could pass everywhere, more or less unfettered on their travels, ideas and cultural elements circulated with the same fluidity as commerce. Read Story

NEW SEASON OFFERS NO BREAKOUT HITS
October 16, 2006 (MediaWeek) NBC's "Heroes," which is the top-ranked new show in the 18-49 demographic and has received a full-season order, is one of the few bright spots among new broadcast series this fall. Other solid performers in the key 18-49 demographic include ABC's "Brothers & Sisters," "Six Degrees" and "Ugly Betty." Read Story

SEEING STARS
October 12, 2006 (New York Times) The taboo against appearing in ads seems to have lifted for a diverse list of A-list celebrities, including Bob Dylan, Susan Sarandon and Gwyneth Paltrow who are hawking products from Apple, Revlon and Estee Lauder, respectively. Mr. Dylan does not suffer from a lack of name recognition and he probably does not need the extra money. But like an increasing number of A-list celebrities, he has come to see doing television spots as a good move. Read Story

GOOGLE BUYS YOUTUBE
October 9, 2006 (ADWEEK) Google made a bold move today into the online video ad market with a $1.7 billion deal to acquire YouTube. The all-stock acquisition, Google's largest to date, will give it access to a vast library of streaming video, much of it created by YouTube users. Google said it would build YouTube as a platform for both amateur and professional content distribution. Read Story

COLUMBIA INVESTIGATES PROTESTS THAT STOPPED SPEAKER
October 6, 2006 (NYTimes) Columbia University officials said today they were investigating what happened Wednesday night when protesters stormed a stage where the founder of a conservative anti-immigration group was trying to deliver an address, an incident that ended in chairs being overturned, and charges that students violated the speaker’s freedom of speech. The incident, at Columbia’s Roone Arledge Auditorium, reflects the strong feelings surround the immigration debate in the United States. It erupted just minutes into a speech by Jim Gilchrist, the founder of the Minuteman Project, a self-appointed band of civilian border patrols that have focused mostly on preventing illegal immigration from Mexico. Read Story

RTNDA CALLS FOR HALT TO VIDEO NEWS RELAEASE INVESTIGATION
October 6, 2006 (LA Times)TV and radio newspeople have asked the FCC to stop investigating stations over use of video news releases and rescind the letters of inquiry to 77 stations, arguing that it is an unwarranted intrusion that is chilling newsgathering. In a letter to the FCC, RTNDA outlined four key issues. It says that the inquiry was prompted by an inaccurate study of VNR use by the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) and that stations don't have to identify the source of VNR's if they have not been paid or promised something for their use, though RTNDA has counseled stations to identify outside sources of material. Read Story

TIME SPENT WATCHING TV INCREASES
September 22, 2006 (LA Times) Despite growing competition from the Internet, iPods, cellphones and other new media, Americans are watching more television than ever, according to a report released Thursday by Nielsen Media Research. The average amount of time that U.S. households had a television set on each day during the yearlong 2005-06 TV season that ended last week increased by three minutes from the year before, to a record of eight hours and 14 minutes, the report said. Read Story

MARKETERS HAVE PROBLEMS WITH MUCH OF WEB VIDEO
September 20, 2006 (Forbes) The Internet video craze is in full swing, and market research firm eMarketer predicts online video advertising will rise 71% this year to $385 million. The problem, however, is that much of what people watch online isn't what marketers want to be associated with. Read Story

MEDIA'S MASTER MANIPULATOR
September 18, 2006 (BusinessWeek) One danger in thinking about media too much is reducing everything to The Game. And, to oversimplify what the late Atlantic Monthly editor and essayist Michael Kelly said, The Game is simply one of burnishing your own image by getting good press. Of scandals weathered wisely; of years feeding the ever-hungry journalistic pack and escaping with all fingers intact. When The Game is taken to its extreme by those who work in media and in media-savvy industries like entertainment and politics, good performances at the above equal virtue. Read Story

AMAZON.COM LAUNCHES TV, MOVIE SERVICE
September 7, 2006 (Breitbart.com) Amazon.com Inc. launched a digital video downloading service Thursday, ending months of speculation that the Internet retailer would be getting into the online TV and movie business. The service, dubbed Amazon Unbox, will offer thousands of television shows, movies and other videos from more than 30 studios and networks, the company said. TV shows will cost $1.99 per episode, and most movies will go for $7.99 to $14.99; movies can also be rented for $3.99. Read Story

ABC SAYS CRITICISM OF 9/11 FILM UNJUSTIFIED—
BUT SCHOLASTIC DROPS COMPANION GUIDE
September 7, 2006 (Editor & Publisher) NEW YORK ABC is rejecting criticism of an upcoming miniseries about the events leading to the 9/11 terror attacks, but Scholastic, which had agreed to widely distribute a companion guide to school, announced Thursday afternoon it had changed its mind. A Scholastic statement read: "Scholastic, the global children's publishing, education and media company, today announced that it is removing from its website the materials originally created for classroom use in conjunction with the ABC Television Network docudrama, 'The Path to 9/11,' scheduled to air on the ABC Television Network on September 10 and 11, 2006. A new classroom discussion guide for high school students is being created and will focus more specifically on media literacy, critical thinking, and historical background. Read Story
More on the Matter

ADS ON PRODUCE AIMED AT KIDS
Expect to find cartoon images on fruit, veggies
September 6, 2006 (Arizona Daily Star) Mickey Mouse, SpongeBob and the Tasmanian Devil are coming to a produce aisle near you. The cartoon characters are popping up on fruit and vegetable packaging across the country as growers strike licensing deals with entertainment companies hungry to cultivate positive images among health-conscious parents and kids. Walt Disney Co., with its overwhelming cartoon capital and cultural clout, is the most significant entry in the produce business. Read Story

AIRTIME: LET BROADCASTERS BE FREE
September 5, 2006 (Broadcasting & Cable) Former FCC Commissioner James H. Quello notes that his Democratic party background might make his position on deregulating the public airways sound like "heresy," but he believes that in today's media environment it is unfair and anti-competitive to saddle broadcasters with public interest regulations. Read Story

TV SMARTENS UP FOR FALL SEASON
September 1, 2006 (USA Today) Clearly, somebody in TV thinks we're getting smarter. At the very least, producers and network executives are giving us a lot more credit than they used to for being able to follow complex thoughts and plots. Large ensembles, serialized stories, complicated twists: Never has a season offered more shows requiring closer, more consistent viewing. Read Story

EU SAYS LOCAL CONTENT KEEPS US SHOWS AT BAY
August 23, 2006 (NY Times) Popular American comedy and drama shows have yet to conquer Europe as most programmes broadcast in the EU are still locally made, the bloc's executive arm said on Tuesday. Figures from the EU showed schedules on average contained 63 percent of European works in 2004, with 31.5 percent of output made by independent producers. Read Story

SHOW LIKE HBO'S ENTOURAGE AND ABC'S DESPERATE HOUSWIVES BECOMING MARKETING POWERHOUSES FOR BRANDS
August 23, 2006 (NY Times) Entourage, the HBO series, which completes its third season on Sunday, is not a breakout hit, like its network siblings “Sex and the City” and “The Sopranos.” But the attractive cast, the glamorous show-business story lines and the show’s popularity among men have made “Entourage” — about the picaresque adventures of a young movie star and his posse — appealing to marketers. Read Story

THE TUBE FLOATS ON CABLEVISION
August 23, 2006 (Multichannel) Cablevision Systems added more than 2 million digital subscribers to The Tube Music Network’s total, pushing the digital-multicast channel past the 13 million mark.The Tube is now available via WPIX in New York, WPHL in Philadelphia and WTXX in Hartford, Conn., through both Cablevision and digital tuners. The channel’s play list includes major- and independent-label videos, as well as exclusive performance clips. Read Story

PARIS HILTON—BEARING HER BRAND
August 18, 2006 (LATimes.com) As Paris Hilton sees it, her main problem is that people don't understand how hard she works. "People are going to judge me: 'Paris Hilton, she uses money to get what she wants.' Whatever," she said. "I haven't accepted money from my parents since I was 18. I've worked my ass off. I have things no heiress has. I've done it all on my own, like a hustler."
Read Story

STUDY: CONSUMERS READY FOR MOBILE SEARCH APPS
August 7, 2006 (Brandweek) The market for mobile search is so new that analysts haven't yet put a dollar figure on it, but it could emerge as a lucrative advertising category, according to a new study by the Mobile Marketing Assn. The MMA report shows that the technology—which puts search engine features on mobile phones—is catching on quickly: most cell phone users are interested in the service and a fair amount (41%) say mobile search ads would not have an adverse impact on their use of the service. Read Story

ART AND MARKETING ALL MASHED UP Video Edits Gain Popularity Online, and Firms Are Noticing
August 2, 2006 (Washington Post) In what has become a predictable pattern, the most-talked-about events of the day are quickly finding their way to the Internet and then "mashed up" by people who use the films as a form of commentary or entertainment. A mash-up video mixes original images or sounds with music, quick-witted narrations or creative transitions. The result is a video dialogue of sorts that makes a statement that is political, personal or merely entertaining. Read Story

WHO'S VIDEO IS IT ANYWAY? YouTube's success has opened Pandora's box of copyright issues

July 28, 2006 (MSNBC) When YouTube was sued on July 14 for copyright infringement, the shock wasn't that the video-sharing service was being yanked into court. Questions had been swirling for months about whether the upstart, which now dishes up 100 million daily videos, was crossing copyright boundaries by letting its members upload videos with little oversight. Read Story

FCC COMMISSIONER OUTLINES KIDS TV AGENDA
July 20, 2006 (Broadcasting & Cable) The FCC should approve compromise children's DTV regulations that are now in bureaucratic limbo, according to Democratic FCC Commissioner Michael Copps. His other goals include enacting guidelines for interactive links in TV shows and adding hearings during ownership reviews to look at the effects of media consolidation on children's programs. Read Story

WALL STREET JOURNAL TO SELL AD SPACE ON FRONT PAGE
Historic Move Underscores Pressures on Newspaper Business
July 19, 2006 (AdAge) In the latest show of big pressures reshaping the newspaper business, The Wall Street Journal has decided to sell ads on its the front page for the first time since very early in its nearly 120-year history. Although many newspapers including the Journal have resisted turning over any of the editorial space on A-1, its most visible real estate, outside forces such as the rise of the internet have put pressure on management to find additional ways to cut costs and sell more ads. Read Story

MAINSTREAM ADVERTISERS FLOCK TO PODCASTS
July 20, 2006 (Mediaweek) Podcasting may only attract a small percentage of U.S. adults, but the emerging medium has already begun to attract several mainstream advertisers. According to The Economics of Podcasting, a new report released Thursday by Nielsen Analytics, part of VNU's media measurement and information group, the most successful podcasts garner as many as two million downloads a month, drawing advertisers such as Dixie Paper Company, which sponsors the Mommycast Podcast Series.
Read Story

REPORTER SUES YOUTUBE FOR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT
July 19, 2006 (TVweek) In what is likely to be the first of many such legal battles, an independent news reporter sued YouTube late last week for copyright infringement. Robert Tur, who covered high-profile news events including the 1992 Los Angeles riots and the freeway chase of O.J. Simpson in 1994, filed suit in U.S. District Court over YouTube's use of his news clips, citing copyright protection. He is seeking $150,000 per violation. The video-sharing site has said in published reports that the suit is without merit. However, it has removed a clip of L.A. riot footage. Read Story

AND NOW, A (SCRIPTED) WORD FROM OUR SPONSORS
Film, TV Dialogue Puts Product Endorsement In a Troubling Place: Characters' Mouths
July 14, 2006 (Washington Post) It's always been there, but it used to know its place. Now it's running riot, out loud. Product placement -- or, as the marketing industry likes to call it, "brand integration" -- has made the leap from props to the mouths of actors in movies and on television. And it's at the point now, says Alan Rosenberg, president of the Screen Actors Guild, that some actors are being asked to speak lines that are essentially commercials -- ones you can't TiVo through. Read Story (Subscription needed)

WILL THE 2008 ELECTION SPUR MEDIA DEALS?
July 13, 2006 (Reuters) Big media deals and strict regulation don't mix well. But will the fear of potential change in control of the White House in 2008 spur mergers and acquisitions before then?That's the question some Washington watchers and bankers are considering as they look beyond this fall's congressional elections to the next presidential contest. Read Story

MTV AND CINGULAR CINCH DEAL ON ON MOBILE CONTENT
July 11, 2006 (Variety) MTV Networks has pacted with Cingular, the nation's largest wireless carrier, in a sweeping deal that will offer content from all of its networks. Pact covering MTV, VH1, Nickelodeon, Spike TV and Comedy Central will make available clips from shows like "The Colbert Report," "South Park" and "Flavor of Love"; the trailer from the upcoming season of "Laguna Beach"; and highlights from classic series like "Beavis & Butt-Head," among others. Read Story

FIVE SECOND ADS
July 6, 2006 (USA Today) It may take longer to read this sentence than to watch one of Honda's recent mini-commercials. In just five seconds, the TV ad shows features of its new Fit hatchback, followed by a computer-type voice saying: "The Fit is Go." Honda's TV tidbit, along with a five-second AOL commercial earlier this year, are examples of one concept marketers are trying to get more bang for the ad dollar in a crowded, on-demand media environment. Done a few times in the past as mainly a stunt, mini-ads placed at the end of commercial breaks are now being tried as a strategic tool against ad-zapping on digital video recorders (DVRs). Read Story

A MAGAZINE INTERVIEW OR AN AD? READ THE FINE PRINT
July 3, 2006 (New York Times) The line separating editorial content and advertising in magazines may have been blurred even more with a film ad in the latest issue of Premiere, the movie magazine. Premiere's July/August 2006 issue includes a two-page, bright yellow ad for "Little Miss Sunshine," a new film from Fox Searchlight Pictures. The right-hand page contains the usual elements of a print ad for film (a cast list, some blurbs from critics) . Under a small "paid advertisement" disclaimer, the left-hand page is devoted to an interview with Greg Kinnear, one of the film's stars, conducted by Howard Karren, who is identified in the ad as a "film journalist." Read Story

POLLUTING THE BLOGOSPHERE
July 1, 2006 (BusinessWeek) Bloggers are getting paid to push products. Disclosure is optional"You can't believe anything you see or read," complains Ted Murphy. "You think those judges on American Idol want to drink those giant glasses of Coke?"
It's funny to hear him say this because Murphy, who founded a Tampa-based interactive ad agency called MindComet, also runs a side business that pays bloggers to write nice things about corporate sponsors -- without unduly worrying about whether or not bloggers disclose these arrangements to readers. (A scan of relevant blog searches strongly suggests that, often, they don't.) Murphy is launching PayPerPost.com, which will automate such hookups between advertisers and bloggers and thus codify a new frontier of product placement. Read Story

HOLLYWOOD AWAKENS TO THE GERIATRIC DEMOGRAPHIC
June 30, 2006 (New York Times) When Hollywood marketing gurus speak about "the older audience," they generally don't mean older by much. Box office tallies, for instance, are often reviewed with an eye to the percentage of moviegoers over and under the age of 25. Studio specialty divisions like Fox Searchlight, Sony Classics and Focus Features might stretch the definition of "older" audiences to moviegoers between 35 and 50. Viewers in that range helped to make movies like "Sideways" and "The Constant Gardener" successful. But where does that leave truly older audiences, fossils over 50 or 60 or even 70? To Hollywood these have been the perennially invisible men and women. Yet change is afoot. Read Story

MOST INTERESTING CANNES SPOTS FROM OUTSIDE THE U.S.
June 29, 2006 (AdAge) Along with the other purposes it serves, the Cannes Lions International Ad Festival is also a window on the best and most interesting TV commercials produced outside the U.S. each year. Here are 10 videos from other countries that were standouts at this year's event. Watch Commerical Spots

NBC TO TEAM WITH YOUTUBE
June 28, 2006 (NY Times) NBC is teaming with YouTube, a popular video Web site, to promote its new shows after finishing the just-ended season in last place among the four major TV networks.The network will create an official NBC Channel on YouTube to show clips from shows like "The Office" that are in its lineup for the season starting in September, NBC said in a statement yesterday. Financial terms were not disclosed. NBC, a division of General Electric based in Burbank, Calif., is counting on YouTube, which offers short movies and home-made clips sent by Web users, to lure viewers to its TV shows. For the season that ended in May, NBC finished behind Fox, ABC and CBS. Read Story

NIELSON: FOLLOW THE VIDEO
June 19, 2006 (Broadcasting & Cable) The mechanics of Nielsen Media's new plan to cope with the technology changes sweeping the television industry are complicated, but company President Susan Whiting manages to capture their scope in a sentence: “It's all about following television content as it moves from device to device.”Nielsen last week detailed a new- media strategy to cope with a world that offers new ways for consumers to watch TV on everything from ipods to PCs. Previously, no one chasing those viewers—advertisers and programmers— had any good way to track what was being watched and how the audience was watching it. Read Story

THE NATIONAL ENTERTAINMENT STATE
June 15, 2006 (The Nation) Ten years ago, just after the passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Nation published a special issue on the National Entertainment State. The issue featured a centerfold chart depicting the tentacles of four colossal conglomerates that were increasingly responsible for determining how Americans got their news--Time Warner, General Electric, Disney/Cap Cities and Westinghouse. And essays by Norman Lear, Walter Cronkite and Mark Crispin Miller, among others, looked ahead to a period of no-holds-barred consolidation green-lighted by the new legislation. Read Story

SURVEY: 48.98% OF MARKETING EXECS HAVE PAID FOR PLACEMENT IN CONTENT Half of Those Who Haven't Say They Would If Given the Chance
June 14, 2006 (AdAge) Something's rotten with the state of media. Nearly half -- 48.9% -- of senior marketing executives admit to paying for editorial or broadcast brand placement, according to an industrywide survey just released by PRWeek. What's more, the survey of 266 chief marketing officers, marketing VPs and directors found that half of those who haven't paid for placement said they would if the opportunity arose. "This type of behavior is as harmful to PR professionals as it is to consumers and the media," said Mark Hass, CEO of the Publicis Groupe-owned public-relations agency. Read Story

TIVO CASTS ITSELF AS WEBPLAYER, OFFERS BROADBAND VIDEO VIA TV
June 8, 2006 (Media Daily News) With video proliferating and convergence increasingly becoming a reality, TiVo will launch a new service that will allow its subscribers to access broadband video on their television sets. Called TiVoCast, the service will initially include video offerings from the National Basketball Association, The New York Times, male-oriented Heavy.com, iVillage and videoblog site Rocketboom. Read Story

CABLE INDUSTRY FACES A LA CARTE PROPOSAL
June 7, 2006 (TVWeek) Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., introduced legislation Wednesday that encourages the cable TV industry and other video service providers to offer programming a la carte. Under the measure, video service providers that offer a la carte to their own subscribers -- and permit programming they own to be offered a la carte by independently owned distributors -- would be rewarded with substantial deregulation. Read Story

DUANE READE IN-STORE VIDEO TARGET NYC MEDIA BUYERS
IBN Bets Millions on Plan to Reach Marketing Industry Elite in Drugstores
June 7, 2006 (AdAge) In-Store Broadcasting Network (IBN) is betting millions it can win over Manhattan's influential media elite inside the cluttered aisles of the Duane Reade drugstore chain, where New York media buyers and planners regularly stop for basics such as milk and shampoo. Read Story

AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH
June 2, 2006 (RogerEbert.com) I want to write this review so every reader will begin it and finish it. I am a liberal, but I do not intend this as a review reflecting any kind of politics. It reflects the truth as I understand it, and it represents, I believe, agreement among the world's experts. Global warming is real. It is caused by human activity. Mankind and its governments must begin immediate action to halt and reverse it. f we do nothing, in about 10 years the planet may reach a "tipping point" and begin a slide toward destruction of our civilization and most of the other species on this planet. Read Story

IN 'DOCU-GANDA' FILMS, BALANCE IS NOT THE OBJECTIVE
June 2, 2006 (Christian Science Monitor) In "An Inconvenient Truth," now playing in theaters, former Vice President Al Gore asserts that global warming may soon eliminate one of the world's great natural vistas: the snows of Africa's Mt. Kilimanjaro. In the forthcoming film "Who Killed the Electric Car?" celebrities such as Mel Gibson and Ed Begley Jr. lament the "murder" of General Motor's EV1 electric car and the loss of California's "most radical smog-fighting mandate since the catalytic converter." Read Story

A POLITICIAN, A JOURNALIST AND A NARRATIVE WALK INTO A BAR...
June 1, 2006 (CBS News, Public Eye) When it comes to politics, the “narrative” can become all-important. It’s the mechanism by which we define the personal and public identities of our leaders and the prism through which they become increasingly examined through. Al Gore invented the Internet, except he really never claimed doing so. President Ford couldn’t take two steps without falling down, President Bush can’t string two words together coherently and President Clinton? Well, let’s just say he has the reputation of having a way with women.
Read Story

FCC SET TO TAKE FRESH LOOK AT MEDIA OWNERSHIP
May 31, 2006 (Wall Street Journal) With Republicans in the majority at the Federal Communications Commission for the first time in 14 months, the agency is poised to begin tackling a host of contentious issues, including changes to media ownership limits. Senate confirmation Friday of Republican Robert McDowell to fill an empty commission seat marks the beginning of a more active phase at Chairman Kevin Martin's FCC, which has been idle on several fronts while deadlocked 2-2 between Republicans and Democrats. the FCC chairman had begun circulating proposals among the other commissioners to reopen two issues: media ownership limits and a requirement that cable operators carry multiple channels from local broadcasters after the transition to digital television instead of just one. Read Story

NET NEUTRALITY BILL WINS IN COMMITTEE
May 26, 2006 (SavetheInternet.com) Yesterday, the House Judiciary Committee passed H.R. 5417, the “Internet Freedom and Nondiscrimination Act of 2006,” which I introduced with Committee Chairman Jim Sensenbrenner, Ranking Member John Conyers and Rep. Rick Boucher last week. The bill requires broadband providers to operate their networks in a non-discriminatory manner and makes sure that the phone and cable companies cannot favor or block access to the Web sites or online services that they pick instead of the consumer. It will keep the Internet an open and free marketplace of ideas and services chosen by consumers instead of big corporations. It will also guard against those who own “the pipes” gleaning profits by creating a virtual toll road. Read Story

FCC PROBES TV STATIONS FOR FAKE NEWS
May 25, 2006 (Bloomberg) Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin ordered a probe of dozens of television stations after a report found they aired advertisements as if they were news reports, people familiar with the inquiry said. The April report by the non-profit Center for Media and Democracy found at least 77 stations, including 23 affiliates of Walt Disney Co.'s ABC network and seven Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. stations, ignored an FCC warning to disclose sponsors. The maximum fine for each violation is $32,500, rising to $325,000 for multiple infractions, said FCC spokesman Clyde Ensslin. Read Story

FIRST LETTERS KIDS LEARN? TV
May 24, 2006 (NY Times) A new study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, found that despite increasing debate over the potentially harmful effects of television on young children, many parents believe that the benefits of a little tube time — whether for their children's development or their own sanity — outweigh the risk of raising a generation of crib potatoes. Read Story

SPEAKING 'TRUTH' TO TEENS DOCUMENTARY STYLE
May 22, 2006 (Brandweek) The American Legacy Foundation continues its “Truth” crusade against smoking this week with a series of four new documentary-style ads that take aim at how cigarette companies market their product. The spots feature an actor and camera crew—posing as documentary-makers—who approach people on the streets of Washington, Baltimore and New York to spread the word about what the ALF considers to be devious marketing tactics of Big Tobacco. Read story

WALLMART FIGHTS FOR SMILEY OWNERSHIP
May 8, 2006 (Common Dreams) The yellow smiley face may strike most people as an overused piece of e-mail shorthand, or a cute interjection in the scribbled notes passed between American teenagers, or a throwback to the era of bright happy colours in the 1970s. But to Wal-Mart, the world's largest and most controversial retailer, it represents big money and a legal battle it fully intends to win. Read Story

MEDIA METRICS: MEASURING INSTORE VALUE
May 2, 2006 (Media Post) As in-store marketing and media gradually increase their profiles to become the centerpiece of many retailers' marketing and brand-building strategies, more retailers are experimenting with digital signage (DS), a technology that delivers video, news, and advertisements to plasma and LCD screens in retail venues. While it remains challenging to separate the hype from reality in this rapidly evolving industry, massive DS deployments by retail giants like Wal-Mart, Target, and Albertsons have given the nascent medium some much-needed credibility while setting expectations for strong growth in 2006. Read Story

HOUSE IGNORES PUBLIC, SELLS OUT THE INTERNET
Growing Right-Left Coalition Gains Momentum, Looks to Senate to Save Internet Freedom
from Telecom Cartel

April 26, 2006 (SavetheInternet.com) Today the House Energy and Commerce Committee struck a blow to Internet freedom by voting down a proposal to protect Network Neutrality from attacks by companies like AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast The "Markey Amendment" supporting Net Neutrality was voted down by a vote of 34 to 22. The "Communications Opportunity, Promotion and Enhancement Act" telecom law, or COPE Act, passed out of the committee without any meaningful protection for Net Neutrality. Net Neutrality means all online activity must be treated equally, and companies like AT&T must allow Internet users to view the smallest blog just as easily as the largest corporate Web site. Read Story

DRUG MARKETERS, TAKE A LOOK IN THE MIRROR

April 24, 2006 (Brandweek) In the wake of the drug industry's credibility crisis, companies have finally started to speak openly and honestly about their business, and its benefits and risks for patients. Now it is time for brand ads to do the same. GlaxoSmithKline's corporate branding spots, which talk about how research can take years, are starting to show dividends for the industry as a whole. Read Story

TOO YOUNG FOR TV? SESAME WORKSHOP DVDS AT CENTER OF DEBATE

April 14, 2006 (NYTimes) A new series of Sesame Workshop DVDs targeted at kids ages 6 months to 2 years is at the center of a rekindled debate about whether very young children should watch TV. A group of child care experts is particularly upset that Zero to Three, a nonprofit child-welfare group, collaborated on the DVDs. Read Story


DISNEY'S WEB MOVE SHAKES UP DECADE OLD TV MODEL

April 11, 2006 (Wall Street Journal) Walt Disney Co.'s decision to offer some of its most popular ABC and Disney Channel shows on the Web free of charge sent various segments of the TV business racing to their corners yesterday to sort out the implications of a move that could turn a decades-old business model on its head. Advertisers are hungry for opportunities to reach consumers on the Web and several major marketers are embracing ABC's plan. But it is still anybody's guess how consumers will react to Disney's plan to stream ABC and Disney Channel shows with non-skippable commercials on the Internet. Read Story

DEVITO, FREEMAN TEAM FOR NET DOCUMENTARY CHANNEL
April 10, 2006 (CNET) Danny DeVito has become the first artist to create a channel on the broadband entertainment service ClickStar. He and ClickStar CEO James Ackerman unveiled Jersey Docs, a showcase for documentary programming from around the world, at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durham, N.C., on Sunday. "It's not just a labor of love--ClickStar will be making money for the filmmakers and for themselves--but we're going to democratize documentaries for the people, whether they're globally or sociologically or politically motivated," he said. "We all love comedy and drama, but the human experience has all that and more."
Read Story

YOUTUBE: WAY BEYOND HOME VIDEO
April 10, 2006 (Businessweek)
All Chad Hurley and Steve Chen wanted to do was share some videos from a dinner party with a half-dozen friends in San Francisco. It was January, 2005, and they couldn't figure out a good solution. Sending the clips around by e-mail was a bust: The e-mails kept getting rejected because they were so big. What they came up with is a Web site, now called YouTube, that has become an Internet phenomenon. In 11 months the site has become one of the most popular on the Net. It shows 30 million videos a day and drew 9.1 million people in February. Read Story

DISNEY'S PHONE LETS KIDS TALK AT PARENTS DISCRETION
April 4, 2006 (USA Today) Walt Disney Co. (DIS) will announce a phone service designed for 10- to 15-year-olds and their parents, dubbed Disney Mobile, at the CTIA Wireless trade show. The features are mostly about letting parents monitor and control how their offspring use the service, Disney says. Read Story

MARKETERS, MEDIA BUYERS REORGANIZE FOR NEW VIDEO AGE
April 4, 2006 (AdAge) Video is killing TV. As a proliferation of digital channels makes content long limited to your boob tube available on a range of devices from your iPod to your laptop, the ad industry is undergoing a semantic shift that’s ousting broadcast TV as its central organizing principle. In its place, a more flexible notion of video is emerging, one that is rendering obsolete many industry silos, forcing the rearrangement of TV and Internet buying, planning and selling units. Read Story

FOREIGN MARKETS SNAP UP US TV SERIES
March 30, 2006 (Variety) Move over, movies. American TV series, not feature films, are the hottest commodity in the international market today. Dramas like "CSI: Miami," "Desperate Housewives" and "Invasion" -- are reckoned to be pulling in upwards of $1 million an episode from foreign deals. "The trend started in the U.K. and Australia, but is now spreading elsewhere," said Jeffrey Schlesinger, president of Warner Bros. Intl. TV, one of the largest distributors of both movies and series in the world. Read Story

HERE'S WHAT YOU COULD BE WATCHING NEXT SEASON
March 22, 2006 (USA Today) It's pilot season in Hollywood, when 100 new projects for next season compete for the affections of network programmers — and a slot on their fall schedules. Unlike last year, when Lost sparked a wave of sci-fi-tinged mysteries (Threshold, Surface, Invasion), there are fewer obvious inspirations. But Lost and 24 have emboldened networks to take more risks with serialized story lines, flashbacks and high-stakes thrillers.
Read Story

LITTLE TYCOONS: A PINT-SIZE MODEL OF LUST FOR POWER
March 22, 2006 (Washington Post) Anyone flipping through current issues of men's fashion and lifestyle magazines will have come across advertisements for Hickey Freeman boyswear in which two 10-year-olds are posed like a couple of jaded GQ models. The blond boy stands with his hands in the pants pockets of his tan poplin three-button suit. He's wearing a blue striped shirt and a candy-colored rep striped tie. His hair is deftly gelled into a faux hawk, a style that is at once brutish and sweetly juvenile. Read Story

IRS PLAN WOULD ALLOW SALE OF TAX DATA TO MARKETERS
March 21, 2006 (Knight Ridder) The Internal Revenue Service is quietly moving to loosen the once-inviolable privacy of federal income-tax returns. If it succeeds, accountants and other tax-return preparers for the first time would be able to sell information from individual returns - or even entire returns - to marketers and data brokers.
Read Story

AOL STARTS ONLINE SERVICE TO COMPETE WITH GOOGLE, APPLE
March 16, 2006 (Wall Street Journal) America Online Inc. launched its new service in the fast-growing market for online video programming -- a television network that shakes the dust off classic television shows and streams them to viewers, with commercials, free of charge. AOL plans to expand the service to more than 300 rotating shows within the year as well as to begin offering a broader range of television content -- including more-recent series and shows from other program owners. Starting this summer, some shows will be available as downloads at prices that have yet to be set, according to Kevin Conroy, executive vice president for AOL Media Networks.
Read Story

SPIELBERG AT THE REVOLUTION The director has seen the digital future, and he'll be there — reluctantly
March 14, 2006 (TIME) Movie director Steven Spielberg is an admitted luddite in at least one respect: when he makes a film, he wants to deal with actual film. Yet he recognizes that the digital revolution is changing the way we watch movies. Read Story

CABLE BIZ WARY OF AT&T DEAL
March 6, 2006 (Variety.com) The National Cable & Telecommunications Association is raising competitive concerns about the proposed merger between AT&T Inc. and BellSouth, using the debate about the $67 billion deal to fight legislative initiatives by telecoms. NCTA president Kyle McSlarrow said in a letter to lawmakers that he wished to "suggest how extraordinary it is for an industry, in which one company alone -- AT&T -- has a market capitalization greater than that of the entire cable industry, not only to ask for special favors from Congress but in fact demand free license to enter the video market while maintaining all current regulation on a much smaller cable industry." Read Story

DESPERATE HOUSWIVES ACTRESS STARS IN DOVE WEBISODES
March 2, 2006 (MediaPost) Unilever's Dove brand Wednesday launched a wide-scale online initiative to promote its new body lotion, Calming Night. For the campaign, Dove is sponsoring a new America Online microsite, and has commissioned MindShare Entertainment to create three original Webisodes starring Felicity Huffman of ABC's "Desperate Housewives." Read Story

E! SIGNS SONY, AMEX TO OSCAR AD PACT
March 2, 2006 (MediaWeek) E! Networks has signed two exclusive sponsors, Sony and American Express, for its new multi-advertising platform program, E! Everywhere, which it will roll out in conjunction with this Sunday's coverage on E! of the Academy Awards pre-show, Live From the Red Carpet, hosted by Ryan Seacrest and Isaac Mizrahi. E! Everywhere is the brainchild of Ted Harbert, president and CEO of E! Networks. "The concept is that everywhere our viewers are, we can reach them with our programming and advertiser messages with one package," said Neil Baker, executive vp, E! Networks and Comcast Network Sales. Read Story

RATED M FOR MAD AVE
Video games are white-hot now that Nielsens rate their ad impact
February 27, 2006 (BusinessWeek) Players of American Wasteland, pro skateboarder Tony Hawk's latest video game, can't help but see that the undisputed king of the ramps is a Jeep (DCX ) fan. As gamers joystick their way around a digital likeness of Los Angeles, from Venice Beach to the Staples Center, they are bound to run across, or into, Jeep Wranglers, Grand Cherokees, and Liberties. The video-game business, already bigger than movie-house box office, did $10 billion in sales last year. Read Story

DELIVERING MEDIA FOR A SONG
February 21, 2006 (MediaPost) "It won't be long," says the Grey Worldwide senior vice president, "before an original song, recorded specifically for an ad campaign, will be the No. 1 single in America. Imagine it: teenagers across the country humming a pop song that was recorded and released by a Madison Avenue agency expressly for its client. Kids will hear the tune on a TV commercial, fall in love with it, then click on the marketer's Web site to download it. And every time, they'll think of the brand associated with the song. Read Story

MONITORING ABLE DANGER CONGRESSIONAL HEARINGS COVERAGE - 25 MINUTES OF MEDIA COVERAGE
February 21, 2006 MediaChannel.org used the powerful new MediaVision tool to monitor television news coverage of the Able Danger Congressional hearings. CNN's "Lou Dobbs Tonight" was the only news show to give Able Danger any significant coverage. Lou Dobbs: "Congress today held unprecedented hearings into the top-secret Army intelligence program code named Able Danger. Able Danger officials, finally, were able to tell their story in open hearings this afternoon about how they identified 9/11 radical Islamist terrorists and how their findings were ignored by officials who could have prevented, they say, 9/11." Watch Clips

STATUS OF US BRANDS SLIPS GLOBALLY AMONG TEENS
February 16, 2006 (Christian Science Monitor) Offer to buy the world a Coke and you'll probably find plenty of takers. But try to sell the iconic American drink, and you might meet with some ambivalence among youths these days, particularly abroad. That's according to a recent study that compared big global brands it considered "teen relevant," gathering feedback from thousands of youths in 13 countries - including the United States. Read Story

MURDOCH'S NEW GROOVE
A conversation with the News Corp. chairman, who's emerged as a leader in digital
media after some smart bets.
February 13, 2006 (Newsweek) Keith Rupert Murdoch may be 74 years old, but the way he sees it, he's got a young man's fingertips for what's cool. Last year the News Corp. chairman acquired MySpace.com, the wildly popular social-networking site, for $580 million. He then spent almost $1 billion to snap up two more Internet businesses for college sports and videogaming. Those sites, plus others in his media empire, now give him bragging rights as the Internet's fourth biggest purveyor of online media and networking sites in terms of page views, and sixth in unique users. Read Story

FYI - FILM YOUR ISSUE
www.filmyourissue.com
February 3, 2006 (PRNewswire) An unprecedented "issue film" competition inviting young Americans 18 to 26, including 7 million college and university students on 1200 campuses nationally, to add their voice to the public dialogue on contemporary issues via 30-to-60 second films, launched January 24, 2006 at the Sundance Film Festival. The idealism and scope of the competition, now in its second year, has brought together such major media partners as Microsoft, MSN Spaces, USA TODAY, mtvU and Entertainment Weekly;national and international leaders like Walter Cronkite, George Clooney, Senator Barack Obama, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Gillian Sorensen and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Read Story

SUPER BOWL ADS GENERATE SUPER HYPE
Consumers seem to have an insatiable appetite for Super Bowl advertising...but do the ads work?
February 3, 2006 (CNN Money.com) Tens of millions of Americans will watch the Super Bowl this Sunday. For many it's more important to see how the Burger King fares than how Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger does against the Seattle Seahawks. The nation is obsessed with Super Bowl ads. It's gotten to the point where the build-up to and analysis of the commercials is almost as extensive as the pre-game and post-game chatter about the football game itself. And many media companies have taken notice. Read Story

MOBILE TV GETS ON A ROLL
January 27, 2006 (CNET) After a lackluster start, mobile TV is generating buzz again. Electronics makers, wireless operators and cell phone technology firms are betting big money that consumers on the go will soon clamor for TVs that they can tote in purses and pockets. But the gulf between the idea and the reality of mobile TV--at least at this point in its development--still presents a few challenges to the consumer. Read Story

WIRELESS STORE SHELF VIDEO ADS TESTED BY BIG MARKETERS
January 26, 2006 (AdAge) Top marketers including Coca-Cola Co., Colgate-Palmolive Co., Kraft Food’s Maxwell House, Bush Bros. and Tyson Foods have signed on to test a new in-store marketing device that automatically turns on a 10-second video ad on shelf as a consumer walks by. Read Story

UNITED NATIONS BACKS $100 LAPTOP
January 26, 2006 (AP) The United Nations lent its support to a project that aims to ship inexpensive, hand-cranked laptops to school-aged children worldwide. Kemal Dervis, head of the UN Development Program, will sign a memorandum of understanding Saturday with Nicholas Negroponte, chairman of One Laptop per Child, on the $100 laptop project, at the World Economic Forum's annual meeting. The program aims to ship a million units by the end of next year to sell to governments at cost for distribution to school children and teachers. Read Story

GOOGLE IS THE MEDIA
Imagining the Google Future
January 25, 2006 (Business 2.0) Some say it began with the launch of Google News, the company's first media aggregation site, in 2002. Others point to Google Book Search, completed in 2007 despite cries of foul play from the publishing industry. But those were just trial runs. Google took its first real step toward media dominance in 2008, when it bought an obscure cable network for $3 billion and transformed it into Google TV.2 The library of video content the company had been archiving for years was now searchable via remote control. Viewers could choose any show they wanted from the history of TV. Read Story

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP BENEFITS COMMUNITY, COMPANY ALIKE
January 23, 2006 (Foundation Center) In recent years, a growing number of companies have created employee volunteer programs designed to get workers involved in their communities and as a way to recruit, train, and retain valued employees, the Baltimore Sun reports. According to a survey of 1,189 executives conducted by the Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College, 81 percent of respondents said they believe corporate citizenship needs to be a business priority. Read Story

iTUNES REACHES 14% OF ACTIVE INTERNET POPULATION—INCREASING 241% OVER LAST YEAR
January 19, 2006 (PRNewswire) Nielsen//NetRatings, a global leader in Internet media and market research, today announced that traffic to Apple's iTunes Web site and use of the iTunes application has skyrocketed 241 percent over the past year, from 6.1 million unique visitors in December 2004 to 20.7 million in December 2005, reaching nearly 14 percent of the active Internet population. Read Story

FREE PRESS ON CAPITOL HILL TO DISCUSS 2006 TELECOM LANDSCAPE
January 16, 2006 (NJ Telecom Update) Media ownership, Internet neutrality and video franchising are likely to be the biggest issues in telecommunications and media reform for 2006, three officials from the nonprofit activist group Free Press said.
Two co-founders of Free Press spoke on Capitol Hill at an event organized by the Future of American Media Caucus, a group of left-leaning Democratic representatives and Rep. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt. The Free Press officials outlined a broad critique of the FCC, the media and mainstream journalism. Read Story

GOOGLE TRIES TO PATENT SINGLE-CLICK CALLING ON MOBILES
January 13, 2006 (Infoworld) In a scenario a bit reminiscent of the infamous Amazon.com Inc. single-click patent, a Google Inc. researcher has filed a patent application for technology that would allow mobile phone users to single click on an advertisement on a Web page and be connected via a voice call to the advertiser. Read Story

GET DATING ADVICE FROM DR. PHIL
January 12, 2006 (USA Today) Subscribers who pay $12.99 a month for Match.com's new "MindFindBind" premium service will get access to McGraw's folksy tips on dating and relationships in the form of short video clips. The service launches with about 50 clips, covering topics such as communication, making good first impressions and having meaningful conversations on a first date. Read Story

CBS PLANS A "MOBISOAP"
January 11, 2006 (Red Herring) Pressured for original content, TV networks design made-for-cell-phone shows.
CBS is developing a soap opera designed specifically for video-enabled mobile phones. The show, tentatively called "Hey, It's Me," will be shown in three- to five-minute segments. The network has not announced a deal with a wireless carrier.
Read Story

GOOGLE AND YAHOO AIM AT ANOTHER SCREEN
January 6, 2006 (The New York Times) Two ascending Internet giants, Google and Yahoo, are to make plain today that they intend to move aggressively beyond the Internet browser and onto the television screen. The two companies, already the most popular services for searching and organizing the vast information on the World Wide Web, want to perform the same function for television, which will increasingly be delivered over the Internet.
Read Story

NETWORKS SEE TELENOVELAS AS MAYBE THE NEXT SALSA
January 5, 2006 (The New York Times) SALSA crossed over from the Latino market to the mainstream. So, too, did the music of Ricky Martin. Can telenovelas do the same? Telenovelas are melodramatic, episodic TV programs, broadcast in Spanish, with sex-drenched stories centered on impossible love affairs, implacable enemies and insoluble family problems. They are hugely popular in Latin America as well as among viewers of United States networks that cater to Hispanic viewers like Telemundo and Univision, which run telenovelas previously seen in countries like Colombia and Mexico. Read Story

WAL-MART HAS A DISAPPOINTING CHRISTMAS
Target, Niche Brands Show Strong Results; Gap Falters
January 5, 2006 COLUMBUS, Ohio (AdAge.com) With dozens of retailers reporting December sales results today, the holiday retail story is one of consumers spending big at high-end luxury retailers (Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus) and trendy niche apparel brands (Abercrombie & Fitch, American Eagle, Aeropostale and New York & Co.). And at Wal-Mart’s cheap-chic rival, Target, rather than at Wal-Mart. Read Story

THE 2006 MEDIA DIET
January 3, 2006 (AdAge.com) This year, the average American will daily consume more than 9.5 hours of media (counting overlapping media, like surfing the Web while watching TV), and will spend just under $900 over the course of the year to do so. In so doing, Americans are becoming their own programmers, turning the world of broadcast and top-down media on its head. Read Story

MEDIA NEWS 2005

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